Tuesday, April 29, 2008

The Grand Coulee

J.L. Ashlock

"The Coast" Magazine
Vol. X August 1905 No. 2

Imagine hewn in the earth's surface a colossal trough sixty miles in length, from one to three miles in width, with perpendicular walls rising to heights of from three hundred to eight hundred feet; the bottom strewn thickly with boulders in places, elsewhere, miniature Saharas of alkali and gravel, grassy meadows, clear freshwater lakes, and alkali ones bitter white; swamps, springs, creeks scattering pine trees, and somewhat in preponderance, sombre colored expanses of sage-brush and greasewood. This is the Grand Coulee. The surrounding country is level and prairie-like, within the last few years having become almost a solid wheat-field, and is known as the Big Bend country, which comprises all of Douglas, and part of Lincoln county, Washington. The region has been termed "the Big Bend" by reason of its being surrounded on three sides by the Columbia river, thus being enclosed in "the big bend" of the Columbia, of which stream the Grand Coulee is supposedly the prehistoric bed.

Ages ago, before the Grand Coulee had come into existence the climate of this section-far different in topography from the Big Bend of today, however was similar to the present climate of our Southern states, Florida in particular. The landscape comprised vast forests-now converted into the coal mines of northern Washington,-lakes, rivers, and mountains in comparison with which our mountains of today would be little more than ant-hills. How long these conditions existed we do not know, but we do know that ages ago, further remote than the imagination can reach, this landscape was buried from hundreds to thousands of feet deep by what is termed geologically, "The Basaltic Overflow." During this period rivers of molten basalt streamed from great cracks in the earth's surface, piling higher and higher, one layer overlapping another, till practically all of that section now comprising Eastern Washington, and extending southward into Oregon, was buried.

After the Basaltic Overflow the Columbia river cut its present channel. This work of time unreckonable was temporarily undone, however, by the Glacial Period. The glacial cap, as it crept southward, seems to have pushed before it mountain-like masses of gravel, which completely filled the channel of the Columbia, and the water, backing up, at length found an outlet to the south in what was then the Grand Coulee: not the great dry canyon of today, but a smaller depression which coursed in a southwesterly direction. The river, seeking the lowest level, naturally, followed this depression for some sixty miles, then seems to have spread out over what hi now called "the Crab Creek Desert;" thence, at various points, evidently joined its regular channel as it completes its curve around the Big Bend, starting westward toward the Pacific ocean; and during the time in which the river channel was blocked in this manner, the river cut the Grand Coulee across the Big Bend. As the glacial cap receded the river gradually resumed its former course, leaving the Coulee perfectly dry. At present the Columbia has not quite worn down to its former level, so immense were the quantities deposited by the glaciers.

Such, as nearly as can be read in the language of geology, was the origin of the Grand Coulee. Though its great, dry walls are now rotten and crumbling with age, in geological chronology, it came into existence but yesterday. For ages upon ages the prehistoric Big Bend was clothed in rich tropical verdure; its forests and plains ateem with antediluvian monsters whose petrified skeletons are now a wonder to the beholder; and in its lakes and rivers unreal Silurian reptiles plunged, and strange shelled things grew and decayed, all blending into the evolution of plant and animal to higher forms. Time inconceivable passed while the layers of basalt were cooling, having with the terrible force of Nature, blotted forever the rich landscape; and lapping thousands of times the length of written history into the past the Columbia began its work of channel-cutting, in which it first cleaved its way through solid basalt, forming the channel in which it flows today. Through solid basalt it forced its way during the Glacial Period, forming what is now the Grand Coulee. And then patiently commenced the work of re-excavation, at which it is engaged today, and will no more than have reached its former level when the great precipices of the Grand Coulee have rotted and crumbled away.

More info can be found here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Coulee

No Rails Over Dry Falls

Charles S. Bihler, Northern Pacific Division Engineer, Tacoma, Wash., to Edwin H.
McHenry, Chief Engineer, St. Paul, Minn., February 7, 1900.

I beg to hand you herewith, report of Mr. Van Arsdol of his
reconnaissance from Coulee City to the Columbia River, via Crab Creek,
and from there to Ellensburg, together with maps and profiles.
The prospects of a favorable line from Coulee City to the Columbia
River are unexpectedly favorable. Mr. Van Arsdol reports that the main
coulee, below Coulee City is impracticable on account of the falls, but
there is a sort of a by-pass leading over into a side coulee which in
general, is somewhat higher than the Grand Coulee, and which would
permit construction without excessive cost.

What the heck did we just buy? The NP View of the Seattle Lake Shore & Eastern

Edwin Harrison McHenry, Receiver, St. Paul, Minnesota, to Edward Dean Adams, Chairman, New York City, April 10, 1896. (Courtesy J.R. Masters, Office Engineer, N.P. Ry., Ret., via Northern Pacific Collection at the Minnesota Historical Society.)

Transmitting report of [John William] Kendrick, General Manager, concerning the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway (the Lake Shore).

You are already familiar with the general subject of the earlier financial transactions of this company. The record is a disgraceful one. Even before the acquisition of stock by the Northern Pacific, the enterprise appears to have been robbed by its promoters.

It was originally intended to complete the line across the Cascade Mountains to a connection with the Spokane Branch, but the amount realized from the sale of bonds being insufficient to defray the expensive construction work of the mountain section the line was not completed The cost of the portion constructed was considerably above the expected amount, and in order to raise more money, the company bonded a number of spurs and sidings.

Under ordinary circumstances it would have been expected that after the consummation of the sale of stock to the Northern Pacific, that the road would have been operated in the interests of the purchaser, but control was not secured until the Northern Pacific had paid for 80 [percent] of the stock, and in the interval the officials and others interest in the Lake Shore apparently devoted their time and attention to looting the property.

The sale to our company was rushed through in a very peculiar manner, and without proper examination by the Traffic and Engineering departments of the Northern Pacific.
The specifications for the construction of the uncompleted portion of the line were accepted by our ex-General Counsel Mr. McNaught, and our Chief Engineer Mr. Kendrick was not allowed an opportunity to examine and comment on same.

The specifications were so drawn as to comply with the kind of road which it was expected to build, and allowed but two miles of sidings in 65 miles (105 km) of main line, and made entirely inadequate provision for operating facilities. The worst feature, however, was the clause which provided that the track would be ballasted with adjacent material, instead of train-hauled gravel ballast. The soil is particularly wet, and a large portion of the line traverses muskeg swamps; this omission would be better understood by a physical examination of the line than words can convey. The natural surface was so bad that the construction company [was] forced to haul in ballast in order to get construction trains over the track.After the Northern Pacific assumed control, it became necessary to incur great expenditures in providing additional sidings, spurs and other facilities for the ordinary transaction of business, and to perform additional ballasting.

The townsites along the line are held by the Virginia Townsite Company, under some deal engineer by the ex-general counsel, who subsequently unloaded same to the Northern Pacific. So valuable was the real estate supposed to be, that no extra width of right-of-way was provided at stations north of Sedro-Woolley, Washington.
A contract was also entered into for the benefit of the townsite interest at Anacortes, whereby the Northern Pacific agreed to operate the Seattle and Northern [a subsidiary of] the Oregon Improvement Company, paying [three percent] upon the appraised valuation, and a wheelage portion of expenses, in addition to a further sum of $80,000, expended in purchasing and interest in Syndicate Addition, and in the construction of improvements costing $35,000, entirely disconnected with the property of the Northern Pacific or the Lake Shore. The operation was shortly discontinued by the general manager on account of the heavy loss incurred, but the rental charges still continue to this day.

Valuable real estate at Seattle and at Snoqualmie Falls, which was formerly supposed to be property of the railroad, was claimed by private parties, and ownership of the Gilman coal mines at Issaquah, Washington, which were currently reported to have been paid for by the railroad, are in possession of outside interests.

Before the purchase by the Northern Pacific of the stock, the Lake Shore, finding it impossible to provide adequate terminal facilities at Spokane from the proceeds of [their] main line bonds, organized a company under the title of the Spokane Union Depot Company, to which the Washington and Idaho Railroad (a branch of the Union Pacific System), were admitted to half ownership. Bonds were issued amounting to a little over $400,000. The stock issue of $500,000 was divided equally between the two companies.

The Lake Shore was reimbursed for the work on that portion of their main line within the limits of the depot grounds from the proceeds of the depot bonds, but to the best of my knowledge and belief, the railway bonds were never cancelled. This property I have nominally estimated at $600,000 . . . but its real value is probably at least $1,000,000. It is used by the Oregon Railway and Navigation [Union Pacific] and the Great Northern systems, and these companies would have to expend at least $1,000,000 to provide equivalent facilities of less actual value. I have made repeated efforts for several years past to have this matter investigated, but owing to the circumstances have thus far been unsuccessful. If this depot stock does not come under the line of the Lake Shore bonds, it could doubtless be attached to satisfy some claims of the Northern Pacific against the Lake Shore.

The Spokane Branch is of little value, apart from the rails, which may be taken up and used elsewhere, with the exception of about two miles of line connecting with the Union Depot property, over which the Great Northern Railway now secures an entrance into Spokane from the west, and for the use of which they pay the heavy annual rental of $72,000.

On the Western Division, that portion of the line from Woodinville Junction to the terminus [at] Sallal near North Bend, Washington, is of little present value, but its earnings power will constantly increase. The remainder, which includes the section between Seattle and Woodinville Junction, and [Woodinville Junction] and the International boundary line at Sumas, Washington, I consider as very valuable property. Its present earnings afford no index to its prospective earnings in the future, and if it is not secured by our company at this time, the omission will be bitterly regretted.

The development of the region is necessarily slow, but I think it is also certain. There is every reason for expecting a steady and progressive increase in earnings for an indefinite period in the future. I am not in entire accord with the general manager's statement that the business secured from this branch may be replaced from points on our own lines. Contrary to the belief, the supplies of cedar in western Washington are comparatively limited, and the greatest reserves of this timber are along the line of the Lake Shore. I think it but a matter of a few years when the cedar will be exhausted on our other lines.
There is also reason to believe that the rate on shingles can be materially advanced without affecting the tonnage, as the present low price of the shingles is brought about wholly by local competition. It was not possible, however, to obtain a higher rate, except by concurrence of the Great Northern, which could not heretofore be obtained, on account of James Jerome Hill persistent effort to reduce the gross and net earnings of our system in order to facilitate his plans.

I understand the reorganization of the Lake Shore has been affected upon favorable terms, but have never had an opportunity to see the plan. I would every strongly recommend the purchase or least of the western divisions of the system, if favorable terms may be obtained. I would also advise the purchase of the Spokane Branch, if the property could be acquired upon satisfactory terms, which in my opinion would be based upon the value of that portion of the line within the city limits over which the Great Northern now gains access, including any liens the bonds may constitute upon the depot property, and the salvage value of the rails upon the remaining portion of the branch.
I further add, for your information, that I do not think the bondholders of the Lake Shore appreciate the fact that the bonds covering that portion of the line sold to the [Spokane Union] Depot Company were not cancelled, but I may be in error regarding this.

McNaught, James.
Counsel for Receivers.
Office: Postal Telegraph Building, New York, New York.

Born: September 9, 1842, at Lexington, McLane County, Illinois.
Education: Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Illinois.
Entered railway service: 1871 as director and counsel Columbia and Puget Sound; since which he has been consecutively 1879 to 1887, division counsel Northern Pacific, jurisdiction extending over Washington and Idaho, with headquarters at Seattle, Washington; 1887 to 1889, general solicitor, headquarters St. Paul, Minnesota; 1889 to October, 1893, general counsel same road; October, 1893, to May, 1895, counsel for receivers, same road.
Busbey, T. Addison, editor. The Biographical Directory of the Railway Officials of America, Edition of 1896. Chicago [Ill.]: Railway Age and Northwestern Railroader, 1896, p. 304.

McHenry, Edwin Harrison (January 25, 1859-August 21, 1931).
Fourth Vice-President New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad and First Vice-President Consolidated Railway, Hartford, Connecticut.
Born: January 25, 1859, at Cincinnati, Ohio.
Educated: Pennsylvania Military College at Chester, Pennsylvania.
Entered railway service: 1883 as rodman on Black Hills Branch, Northern Pacific, since which he has been consecutively rodman, chainman, draftsman, leveler, transitman, assistant engineer, division engineer, principal assistant engineer, and November 1, 1893, to January 1, 1896, chief engineer; October, 1895, to October, 1896, also receiver same road; September 1, 1896, to September 1, 1901, chief engineer reorganized road, the Northern Pacific, in charge of location, construction and maintenance; 1901 and 1902, visited China, Japan and Philippine Islands; June 1, 1902, to May 10, 1904, chief engineer, Canadian Pacific; October 1, 1904, to date, first vice-president, Consolidated Railway, in charge of construction, operation and maintenance of the trolley lines owned by the New York, New Haven and Hartford, and also fourth vice-president, New York, New Haven and Hartford, in charge of Electrical Department covering electrical construction and maintenance of lines operated by electricity.
Busbey, T. Addison, editor. The Biographical Directory of the Railway Officials of America, Edition of 1906. Chicago [Ill.]: Railway Age, 1906, pp. 381-82.

Seattle Lake Shore & Eastern Depot Doings in Spokane

On April 21, 1888, businessman of Spokane Falls subscribed $175,000 for the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern, so it would not pass too far from the town on its way east from Puget Sound. The SLSE professed also to be interested in the Colville region.

The Spokane Falls and Northern (Great Northern) would use a union depot on the north side of the river to be shared by the Lake Shore, now familiarly the “Seattle and Elsewhere,” and the Oregon Railway and Navigation (Union Pacific). The red brick building, built by the SF&N, was 2 stories high and stood on the river bank on the east side of Division Street. The site was covered with rocky hillocks, and crews working day and night shifts shook the city awake at 2 o’clock each morning blasting to level the area. The rock debris was dumped into ponds and used to extend the property toward the river by filling, and operation that cost approximately $100,000.

Northern Pacific Civil Engineer Clarence White

From “An Illustrated History of the State of Washington”, by Rev. H.K. Hines, D.D., The Lewis Publishing Co., Chicago, IL., 1893

CLARENCE L. WHITE, civil engineer of Seattle, was born in Littleton, Buchanan county, Iowa, November 27, 1856. His parents, H. J. and Elizabeth (Richmond)White, were natives of Canada, where Mr. White learned the trade of millwright, and upon coming to Littleton about 1854, among the pioneer settlers of that locality, he built a flouring mill, which he operated a number of years.

Clarence L. attended the public schools of Littleton and worked in his father's mill up to 1872, when the entire family came to Seattle, arriving on the 2d day of September. Spending the first winter in Seattle, our subject attended the public schools, and in the following summer went with the family to a ranch near what is now Anacortes, and then worked at clearing up and improving the ranch until the summer of 1876, when subject began "rustling" for himself, attending the Territorial University at Seattle during the winters.

In the spring of 1879 he went to Spokane Falls as editor and manager of the Spokane Times, the first newspaper started in that city. His health failing from the sedentary work, he was obliged to resign within the following summer, and then went on a Government survey in the Grand Coulee country.

With restored health he returned to Spokane Falls in November, 1880, and during the winter was employed as Deputy Auditor of Spokane County, under Mr. J.M. Nosier. During the summer and autumn of 1881 Mr. White was in the Northern Pacific survey party in Idaho and Western Montana, acting as chainman and leveler. About Christmas of that year he returned to Seattle and began working for Whitworth & Thomson, civil engineers, and continued with them, except during the winter of 1882-83, when he took a course in surveying in the university.

In January, 1887, Mr. White went out in a party on the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad, as transitman, working during the summer and following winter on preliminary and location, from Seattle to the summit of Snoqualmie Pass in Cascade Mountains.

In the spring he was transferred to the Spokane Falls division of the same road, doing work in Spokane and westward to the Columbia River. In July he was sent out as resident engineer in charge of work at crossing of Grand Coulee, 120 miles westward of Spokane Falls, at a point where the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad and the Northern Pacific Railroad were fighting for location. This work was abandoned, soon after the troublesome point was settled in favor of the Seattle road, and Mr. White returned to Spokane and had charge of the construction of the large railroad trestles near Spokane.

Upon the completion of this work he returned to Seattle, and in the spring of 1889 became partner in the firm of H.H. Thomson & Co. In March, 1890, the firm name was changed to Thomson & White, which continued until Mr. Thomson became City Engineer, and thereafter Mr. White operated alone.

Sunday, April 27, 2008

Journal Entries From The Towns on the CW

Edited by Honor Wilhelm.

Vol 4 November, 1902

Passing out of Lincoln county at this place we arrive at Hartline, where the first settler located in 1883. He was Horace Arnes. D. E. Reeves opened the first store in 1889 and secured the establishment of a post office here in that year. The town was laid out by John Hartline who located here in 1888.

Coulee City is located at the terminus of the Washington Central. The townsite was homesteaded by Mrs. Haynes in 1888. She sold out to G. K. Reed and N. Galusha, who laid out the town. Levi Salmon located near by in 1887. The post office was first secured at McEntee, one mile away, where the first postmaster was G.R. Roberts, who moved it to Coulee City and renamed it in 1889. The town was located here because it was the only place where the Grand Coulee could be crossed. James Odgers established the first newspaper at this place in 1889, "The Coulee City News." "The Coulee City Review" was established last spring, of which F. C. Gibson is the editor. D. R. Evans is the pioneer hotel keeper. The stage to Waterville and Brewster is taken at this place. The principal industry is stockraising, including horses, cattle and sheep. There are some wheat and fruit farms in the adjacent country. When the railroad is completed through to Adrian, where connections will be made with the Great Northern railway for Seattle, this place is destined to become an important trade and commercial point.

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Northern and Southern Railway Company


ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION
of the
NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY.
--#--

ARTICLES OF IHCORPORATION
of the
N O R T H E R N A N D S O U T H E R N
R A I L W A Y C O M P A N Y .
- - # - -

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, That we, the undersigned residents of the State of Washington, hereby associate ourselves together for the purpose of forming a corporation, and for that purpose execute these Articles in triplicate.

FIRST:-
The name of this corporation shall be the NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY.

SECOND:-
The principal place of business of this corporation shall be in the City of Waterville, in the County of Douglas, in the
State of Washington.

THIRD:-
The tine of the existence of this corporation shall be Fifty Years, from and after the First day of June, A. D. 1907.

FOURTH:-
The capital stock of this corporation shall be Seven Million Dollars, divided into 70,000 shares, of the par value of $100.00 a share.

FIFTH:-
The objects for which this corporation is formed, are:

(a) To survey, locate, build and construct, conduct, maintain, and own and operate, a railroad, either steam or electric, or both; (and telegraph and telephone lines in connection therewith) from the City of Waterville in Douglas County, in the State of Washington, in an Easterly and Southeasterly direction, and over the easiest and most practical grades, from the said City of Waterville, to the City of Pasco, in Franklin County, State of Washington, and distant from said City of Waterville, measured on the line of said designated course about 175 miles, which is the estimated length of said railroad, telegraph and telephone lines; together with a feeder for said original line, commencing in the Moses Coulee, in said Douglas County, State aforesaid, at or near what is known as the Levi McCartney ranch, on said main line, and running first in an easterly and northeasterly direction up and around the head of the said Moses Coulee, and from thence in a westerly and southwesterly direction over the most practical and easiest grades to a point at or near the Post Office of Farmer in said Douglas County where the sane connects again with the original and main line, covering in a loop a distance of about 65 miles; and to acquire rights of way and terminal grounds therefor, and construct and maintain all facilities for such road and terminals.

(b) To buy, lease, or otherwise acquire, other railways and rights of way therefor, and to operate the same when so acquired, as a part of its said system or systems.

(c) To construct, or otherwise acquire, railways and rights of way, other than the railways in to and out of the City of Waterville, anywhere in the State of Washington, or elsewhere in any State or Territory of the United States, and to maintain and operate the same when so acquired and constructed as a part of its said system or systems.

(d) To acquire, or construct, and to operate electric light plants in the City of Waterville and in other cities, towns and villages in the said State of Washington.

(e) To construct and operate electric light systems in the State of Washington outside of cities, towns and villages, for the accommodation of farming and suburban communities.

(f) To purchase, acquire by condemnation, or otherwise, and to improve and develop, and to generate power for electrical, manufacturing and other power purposes.

(g) To purchase, acquire by condemnation or otherwise, and to improve, develop, generate and transmit electricity for its own purposes, for power and lighting, and to sell for power and

Light purposes to cities, towns and villages for municipal lighting and other municipal purposes.

(h) To construct or erect in the City of Waterville, and in other cities, towns and villages in the said State and in the faming communities of said State, poles, wires and necessary appliances for transmitting electricity for any of the purposes for which it may lawfully transmit and use the same under these Articles of Incorporation.

(i) To apply for and receive from the said City of Waterville and other said cities, towns and villages in the said State, franchises to use the streets and to occupy the same, and to cross the same so far as may be necessary, proper or convenient for the purposes authorised by these Articles, for the operation of railways and for the accommodation of its poles and wires, and for the purpose of the transmission of electric power, or any of the purposes for which electric power may be used or transmitted under these Articles, and to receive from the said City of Waterville, and other cities, towns and villages in said State, franchises to occupy the streets thereof with poles, wires and other necessary apparatus for furnishing electric light and power for municipal, railway, or other purposes; and said corporation shall have the power to assign such franchise or franchises so obtained, to its successors in interest.

(j) To apply for and receive from the Counties of said State, or from such other body or bodies as have authority in the premises, franchises to occupy the roads and highways with its tracks, and with its poles and wires, and to operate its system of railways, and its system of electric transmission thereon; and said corporation shall have the power to assign such franchise or franchises so obtained, to its successors in interest.

(k) To purchase, lease or otherwise acquire, realty in said State and to build on or otherwise improve said realty, and to sell, mortgage, lease or otherwise dispose of the same.

(l) To purchase, lease, or otherwise acquire personal property in said State and to develop or otherwise improve said property, and to sell, lease, mortgage, or otherwise dispose of same.

(m) To purchase, acquire, own, vote, sell, or otherwise manage or dispose of the stock, in whole or in part, of any corporation organized under the laws of the State of Washington or under the laws of any State or Territory of the United States.

(n) To negotiate and sell bonds in the financial markets of the United States and of the world. To sell said bonds by mortgage or mortgages, trust deed or trust deeds, upon any or all of its property, both real and personal, to a trustee, either private or corporate, and either in the State of Washington or elsewhere.

(o) To purchase, own, operate and maintain coal mines and rock quarries for the exclusive use of this corporation upon and in the operation of its line or lines of railways.

(p) To purchase, acquire by condemnation or otherwise, rights of way for any of the purposes authorized by these Articles of Incorporation.

And, finally, to do any and all things proper, necessary, or convenient, to carry out any of the foregoing purposes.

SIXTH: -
The number of Trustees of this corporation shall be four; and the names of the first Trustees who shall manage the affairs of the corporation until the 2nd day of December, 1907, are
A. L. Rogers Residence Waterville, Washington.
M. B. Howe Residence Waterville, Washington.
I. W. Matthews Residence Waterville, Washington.
A. E. Case Residence Waterville, Washington.

(signature, A L Rogers) (Seal)

(signature, M B Howe) (Seal)

(signature, I W Matthews) (Seal)

(signature, A E Case) (Seal)

STATE OF WASHINGTON)
SS:
County of Douglas)

On this 24th day of June 1907, before me, J. G. Kennedy,
a Notary Public, in and for the State of Washington duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared, A. L. Rogers, M. B. Howe, I. W. Matthews and A. E. Case,
known to me to be the persons described in and who executed the within and foregoing Articles of Incorporation, and each for himself and not one for the other acknowledged to me that they executed the same freely and voluntarily, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned.

In Witness Thereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my official seal the day and year herein first above written.

(signed) J G Kennedy

Notary public in and for the State
of Washington, residing in Water-
ville, Washington.
My Commission Expires January 25, 1910.

LIST OF OFFICERS
of the
NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY.
- -#- -

STATE OF WASHINGTON, )
)SS
County of Douglas.

A. L. Rogers, being duly sworn, on oath, deposes and says: That he is the President of the NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, a corporation, with its principal place of business in the City of Waterville, Douglas County, State of Washington, and was elected such President on the 16th day of July A. D. 1907, to serve until the 2nd day of December A. D. 1907.

That the following is a true and correct list of the officers of the said NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, with their respective titles of office, their names and addresses:

Officers. Names. Addresses.

Trustee A. L. Rogers Waterville, Washington.
Trustee M. B. Howe Waterville, Washington.
Trustee I. W. Matthews Waterville, Washington.
Trustee A. E. Case Waterville, Washington.
President A. L. Rogers Waterville, Washington.
Vice-President M. B. Howe Waterville, Washington.
Secretary-Treasurer A. E. Case Waterville, Washington.
Chief Engineer I. W. Matthews Waterville, Washington.

That all of said officers were elected at the same time and for the same term as the affiant.

(signature A L Rogers)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 16 day of July A.D. 1907.

(signature J G Kennedy)
Notary Public in and for the
State of Washington, residing
at Waterville.

Attest: (signature) A E Case
Secretary

Sunday, April 20, 2008

Hartline Depot

The Northern Pacific depot in Hartline, WA has been gone for a very long time.

The old Sanborn Fire Insurance maps show where it was located in 1922.


It was built around 1890 and was torn down in 1944. Nothing was ever built in its place, as it was between two different sets of railroad tracks.



Today, the open spots sports a Burlington Northern era station sign.

Friday, April 11, 2008

More than you wanted to know about the Dam railroad



COMPLETION OF GRAND COULEE DAM LEFT POWERHOUSE AND FOUNDATION FOR PUMPING PLANT

Schedule, Specifications, and Drawings

Columbia Basin Project, Washington

United States Department of The Interior
Bureau of Reclamation

Specifications No. 757

Bids will be received by the Bureau of Reclamation, at the Civic Building, Spokane, Washington, until 1:00p.m., December 10, 1937

Schedule

Page 4
Item 11 Excavation, common, for roads and railroad
1,500 cubic yards at $1.50 per cubic yard

Item 12 Excavation, rock, for roads and railroad
118,000 cubic yards at $2.00 per cubic yard

Page 5
Item 27 Laying ties and rails
750 track feet, at $1.70 per track foot

Item 28 Applying rail anchors
850 anchors, at $.20 per anchor

Item 29 Ballasting railroad track
600 cubic yards, at $3.00 per cubic yard



Page 13
Item 180 Transporting freight of all kinds on the construction railroad for the Government or its agents, other than the contractor, in carlots between delivery yard and Government siding at head of Grand Coulee
310 cars, at $55 per car

Page 14
Item 181 Transporting freight of all kinds on the construction railroad for the Government or its agents, other than the contractor, in less than carlots between delivery yard and Government siding at head of Grand Coulee
5,000 cwt, at $.30 per cwt

Item 182 Transporting freight of all kinds on the construction railroad for the Government or its agents, other than the contractor, in carlots between delivery yard and Government siding at head of Grand Coulee
100 cars, at $70 per car

Item 183 Transporting freight of all kinds on the construction railroad for the Government or its agents, other than the contractor, in less than carlots between delivery yard and Government siding at head of Grand Coulee
2,000 cwt, at $.30 per cwt

Item 184 Transporting freight of all kinds on the construction railroad for the Government or its agents, other than the contractor, in carlots between delivery yard and Government siding at head of Grand Coulee
1,000 tons, at $4 per ton

Total bid price for all 185 items: $34,442,224.00

Page 20
Special Conditions

18.
Rate of wages
Brakeman (railroad, standard gage road 30 miles long) $.90 per hour

Page 21
Rate of wages
Conductor, railroad (standard gage Government railroad, 30 miles long) $1.00 per hour
Fireman, railroad $.90 per hour

Page 22
Rate of wages
Locomotive engineer $1.35 per hour

Page 31
Materials

29.
Materials furnished by the Government
…All other materials furnished by the Government will be delivered to the contractor f.o.b. cars at Odair, Washington.



Page 33 and 34

32.
Storage of Materials
… The Government has constructed a siding on the Government construction railroad at the head of Grand Coulee, of sufficient length to provide for unloading and storing equipment to be installed by the Government and has installed a gantry crane of sufficient capacity to handle the heaviest pieces required. All additional sidings and spur tracks at the head of Grand Coulee, required for unloading and storing materials delivered to the contractor at Odair, Washington, shall be constructed by and at the expense of the contractor.

Page 43, 44, and 45

50.
Construction Railroad
A railroad for use in transporting construction materials to the dam site has been constructed by the Government, extending from its junction with the Northern Pacific Railway at Odair, Washington, to the dam site, a distance of about 30 miles, as shown on the location map. The railroad is standard gage, of substantial construction, and consists of a single track, with no siding, passing, or spur tracks, except for the delivery yard at Odair, one passing track at the head of Grand Coulee, a spur track to the gantry crane, side tracks at the cement unloading and blending plant, and a side track to the Government warehouse and storage yard. The railroad will be turned over to the contractor by a written order from the contracting officer, and upon the receipt of such written order, the contractor shall immediately accept the railroad and assume its operation and maintenance. The contractor shall construct at his own expense or purchase from the previous contractor, all additional siding, passing, spur, and switching tracks and wyes required for his operations, shall furnish and install, when and where directed by the contracting officer, a complete switch layout for a spur track to the field fabrication plant of the contractor for furnishing the penstocks and pump inlet pipes, and shall furnish all necessary rolling stock and other equipment require for the operation and maintenance of the railroad. The contractor shall operate and maintain the railroad and shall haul and handle all materials delivered to the contractor by the Government as provided in paragraph 29 for use in the construction of the dam, powerhouse, and foundation for the pumping plant, and the entire cost thereof shall by included in the prices bid in the schedule for the items of work in the performance of which the railroad is used. The engines used by the contractor shall not be heavier than 200 tons and carloads shall not be heavier than 300,000 pounds: Provided, That for infrequent loads, carloads heavier than 300,000 pounds may be transported subject to the specific approval of the contracting officer: Provided further, That all materials delivered in carload lots to the contractor by the Government may, at the option of the contractor, be hauled without charge over the railroad. In addition to the materials to be transported over the railroad as above specified, the contractor shall also transport in either direction, from the delivery yard at Odair to the Government siding or field fabricating plant at the head of Grand Coulee, to the siding at the Government warehouse, or to the dam, all materials of every kind and nature required to be transported for the Government or for other contractors or agents of the Government engaged on work on any part of the Columbia Basin project. Such additional transportation service shall be promptly and efficiently handled to the satisfaction of the contracting officer, and the contractor shall be held liable for any damage to material while in the care of the contractor during loading, transporting, and unloading. The rules and regulations under which such additional transportation service shall be furnished shall be subject to the approval of the contracting officer. Payment for such additional transportation service will be made at the unit prices bid under items 177 to 184, inclusive, of the schedule. The unit prices bid in the schedule for transporting materials for the Government or its agents, other than the contractor, shall include the cost of loading and unloading such materials and, in the case of materials required to be placed in the Government warehouse, shall include the cost of placing the materials in the warehouse as provided in paragraph 29, Provided, That all materials delivered to the plant for the field fabrication of penstocks and pump inlet pipes will be unloaded by the contractor for fabricating the penstocks, and pump inlet pipes: Provided further, That all completed sections of penstocks and pump inlet pipes delivered to the contractor for transportation to or installation in the dam will be placed on the cars by the penstock and pump inlet pipe contractor, but all blocking, bracing, and ties required for safe transportation of the pipe sections shall be furnished and placed by the contractor under these specifications. The unit of measurement for payment under items 181 and 181 will be one hundred pounds and under items 180 and 182 will be a car. In making payment to the contractor for any shipment in one car, the rate will be used which will result in the lower cost to the Government. The contractor will not be paid under items 177 to 184, inclusive, for transporting any materials and equipment which are furnished to the contractor by the Government for installation or use in the work to be done by the contractor under these specifications. The previous contractor has transported and placed in the warehouse or storage yard materials for installation in the work. For such materials which are installed by the contractor under these specifications, the Government will deduct from the unit price bid in the schedule for installing the materials, the cost of transportation over the construction railroad as determined from the unit prices bid under items 180 to 183, inclusive, of the schedule. All transportation service to be paid for under items 177 to 184, inclusive, of the schedule will be ordered in writing by the contracting officer, and the unit prices bid in the schedule shall include the cost of all rental, demurrage, or other charges for railroad equipment while in the contractor's possession and the cost of returning the empty cars to the railway company at the delivery yard at Odair. In the event of any dispute or doubt as to the payment to be made for any transportation or unloading service specified herein or as to the rules or regulations applicable thereto, the matter shall be submitted to the contracting officer, whose decision shall be final. Insofar as practicable and applicable, as determined by the contracting officer, the practices and regulations current with the Northern Pacific Railway Company will be used as a guide by the contracting officer in approving regulations and deciding questions regarding them or their application. The contractor shall install and maintain all necessary crossing and warning signs and will be held responsible for the safe and proper operation of the railroad. The joint section of the railroad, being the delivery yard at Odair and a portion of the main line of the Northern Pacific Railway at the delivery yard, will be used in common by the Government, the railway company, and the contractor for delivering cars and equipment from one party to the other, but the operation of the joint section will be under the direction and control of the railway company, and before making use of the joint section, the contractor shall agree, in writing, with the Government and the railway company, to observe, so far as applicable to the contractor, the terms and conditions of the agreement between the United States of America and the Northern Pacific Railway Company, copy of which may be examined in the office of the Bureau of Reclamation at Washington, D. C., Denver, Colorado, or Coulee Dam, Washington. All operations of the contractor in connection with the railroad shall be subject to the approval of the contracting officer. The contractor shall maintain the railroad in good operating condition for the entire period during which the construction railroad is being operated by the contractor. If, in the opinion of the contracting officer, the contractor does not at any time properly maintain the railroad or any part thereof, the Government reserves the right to do any work which, in the opinion of the contracting officer, is necessary for its proper repair, maintenance, or operation, and to charge the cost thereof to the contractor. Within 10 days after the date on which the railroad is turned over to the contractor, the contractor shall inaugurate regular train service at least twice each week until the railroad is returned to the Government. If, in the opinion of the contracting officer, the contractor fails at any time to provide proper transportation service as required, the Government reserves the right to assume complete control of the railroad, to take over any or all of the contractor's railroad equipment in use on the railroad, and to operate the railroad for the purpose required by the contract at the expense of the contractor. Upon the completion of the contract under these specifications, the contractor shall return the railroad to the Government in as good condition as when turned over to the contractor, reasonable wear and tear excepted. The Government reserves the right to operate its own trains or motor cars of any nature desired, for any period of time, over the railroad: Provided, That such operation of trains or motor cars will be arranged to interfere as little as practicable, as determined by the contracting officer, with the necessary work of the contractor, and the trains shall be dispatched by the contractor. Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, the cost of all work described in this paragraph shall be included in the unit prices bid for the various items of work in the schedule in the performance of which the railroad is used.

Page 65, 66, and 67

Railroad

84.
Laying ties and rails
The extension of the railroad to the left powerhouse shall be constructed by the contractor. All ties, rails, angle bars, tie plates, spikes, bolts, and nut locks will be furnished by the Government as provided in paragraph 29. Ties shall be placed 16 to the 30-foot rail and 17 to the 33-foot rail. For shorter rails the spacing shall be in the proportion of 16 to a 30-foot rail. The ties shall be placed and maintained normal to the line of the rails, and the ends of the ties on one side of the track shall be lined parallel to the rail. Selected ties shall be used for curves of two degrees or more and at rail joints, as directed by the contracting officer. The heart side of ties shall be turned down except that where ties are not straight the bow side shall be up. Ties shall be adzed where necessary to obtain even rail bearing. The ties shall not be damaged by picks, shovels, or other tools or by over-spiking. Tie hooks or tongs shall be used instead of picks. The rails will be approximately 90-pound second-hand or relay rail. In unloading from the cars, the rails shall be skidded or otherwise carefully handled. All rails shall be laid with staggered joints. The joints on one side shall not vary more than 12 inches in either direction from the center of the opposite rail. Rails of less than standard length shall be used for curves, to bring the joints in proper position. Before being laid, all rails on curves of three degrees or more shall be curved by means of an approved rail bender. Relay rails shall be matched so that the worn portions will be on the same side of the rail and shall be laid with the worn portion on the inside or outside of the track as directed by the contracting officer. Rails shall be laid with the base of the rail true to the plane of the track. The rails shall not be driven into position with a hammer, maul, or any similar tool, but shall be moved with rail tongs or lining bars. The proper allowance for expansion and laying rail will be governed by the temperature of the rail, as determined by the contractor by means of a rail-laying thermometer. The proper allowance for expansion at joints shall be secured by using standard metal expansion shims. For 30-foot lengths of rail, the shims shall be omitted at every tenth joint. The rail- laying thermometer and expansion shims shall be furnished by the contractor and shall besubject to the approval of the contracting officer. To insure proper adjustment at joints, the rails shall be brought together, with expansion shim inserted, and carefully bolted and all bolts thoroughly tightened before spiking; after which the expansion shim shall be removed. Each joint shall be supported by two ties, with the spikes in the slots provided in the angle bars. Special care shall be taken in applying angle bars. The bolts in each angle bar shall be placed with two heads inside and two heads outside of the rail. A full set of bolts with nut locks shall be used at each joint and, where necessary, holes shall be drilled in the rails to accomplish this. The inside of each angle bar and that portion of the rail covered by the angle bar shall be given a brush coat of oil before the angle bar is placed. After the joint is completed and bolts fully tightened, the outside of the angle bar shall be given a brush coat of oil. The oil for this purpose will be furnished to the contractor as provided in paragraph 29, and the necessary brushes shall be furnished by the contractor. All nuts shall be tightened by using wrenches of proper sizes to fit the nuts and bolts. Wrenches for 7/8 inch bolts shall have a lever arm of 36 inches, and for 1-inch bolts the lever arm shall be 48 inches. Joints shall not be spiked in holes in slots until after all bolts are fully tightened. All ties shall be fully tie-plated. Care shall be taken to obtain accurate gage of track, uniform bearing of the plates on the ties, and true bearing of the rails on the plates. The plates shall be set with the entire face of the shoulder in contact with the base of the rail, and in no case shall the tie plate be set with the shoulder under the base of the rail. All rails shall be fully spiked, four spikes to each tie. On curves of three degrees or more, three spikes shall be used to each rail, the extra spike being placed on the inside of the rail. A track gage shall always be used when spiking track. The standard gage of 4 feet 8 1/2 inches shall be used on tangents and on curves up to and including eight degrees. For curves sharper than eight degrees, the gage shall be widened at the rate of one-sixteenth of an inch for each degree of curve above eight degrees. The rail shall be held against the gage with a bar while the spikes are being driven. Spikes shall be started vertically and square and shall be driven so that the face of the spike will come in contact with the base of the rail. Spikes shall not be straightened while being driven, and care shall be taken not to overdrive the spikes. Angle bars shall be spiked in the slots provided for this purpose. The outside spikes of both rails shall be near one edge of the tie, and the inside spikes shall be near the other edge. The inside and outside spikes shall be spaced as far apart as the face and character of the tie or tie plate will permit, but no spike shall be nearer than two inches from the edge of the tie. After the track is laid, it shall be brought to approximate alignment before any ballast is placed. Bolts shall be gone over and retightened at short intervals and after several trains have passed over the track and before final acceptance all bolts shall be gone over again and thoroughly tightened to the satisfaction of the contracting officer. Payment for laying ties and rails will be made at the unit price per track-foot bid therefor in the schedule and for the actual number of track feet of track laid, which unit price shall include the cost of unloading, hauling, and placing all ties, rails, angle bars, tie plates, spikes, bolts, and nut locks in accordance with the specifications. No payment will be made for temporary spurs or sidings constructed by the contractor for his own use to facilitate construction work.

85.
Rail anchors.
Rail anchors shall be applied where directed by the contracting officer and in the most approved manner for the particular type of anchor furnished. Rail anchors will be furnished to the contractor by the Government as provided in paragraph 29. Payment for applying rail anchors will be made at the unit price bid therefor in the schedule, which unit price shall include the cost of unloading, hauling, and applying the rail anchors.

86.
Ballasting railroad track.
The track for the extension of the railroad to the left powerhouse shall be ballasted as shown on the drawings or as directed by the contracting officer, and, in addition thereto, sections of the existing track near the spurs to the pumping plant shall be raised in grade by increasing the depth of ballast. All ballasting material shall be furnished by the contractor. Pit-run gravel from which all cobbles over three inches in size shall be raked may be used. The required amount of ballasting material shall be spread uniformly along the track, the track raised to the required height as indicated by grade stakes set by the contracting officer and the material solidly tamped under the ties. In raising track each jack shall be so regulated as to avoid bending angle bars or straining joints. After being raised, the track shall be aligned to conform strictly to the stakes set by the contracting officer. Each tie shall be tamped from 15 inches inside the rail to the end of the tie with a tamping bar, tamping pick, or shovel. The end of the tie outside of the rail shall be tamped first, and, if possible, a train or trains shall be allowed to pass over the track before tamping inside of the rail. No trains shall operate over the track until the tamping outside the ties has been completed. Rails that are damaged by reason of neglect on the part of the contractor to comply with these requirements shall be replaced at his expense. The center of the tie shall be tamped loosely with the blade of a shovel. After being settled by passage of a few trains, the final tamping and adjustment to line and grade shall be made and all ties shall be well tamped with tamping bars or tamping picks. During the ballasting operations, the elevation and sighting boards shall be in constant use. On curves, the outer rail shall be elevated, and the elevation tapered out on tangents at both ends, where necessary, as directed by the contracting officer. On all other portions of tangents, both rails shall be brought to the same level. After the ballasting is completed and the track is in perfect gage, surface, and line according to the stakes, the ballast shall be neatly trimmed to the section shown on the drawings or as directed by the, contracting officer and any surplus material shall be spread evenly along the slopes of the embankments outside of the roadbed section. Measurement for payment for ballasting will be made of the material in place after tamping and to the lines and grades shown on the drawings or as established by the contracting officer, and the space occupied by the ties will not be included. Payment for ballasting railroad track will be made at the unit price per cubic yard bid therefor in the schedule, which unit price shall include the cost of furnishing, hauling, placing, and tamping the required amount of material, raising and aligning the track, and surfacing as provided in this paragraph.

1943 Warden Wreck


Inv-2717
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON
INVESTIGATION NO. 2717
THE CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE, ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY REPORT IN RE ACCIDENT AT WARDEN, WASH., ON AUGUST 4, 1943
SUMMARY
Railroad: Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific
Date: August 4, 1943
Location: Warden, Wash.
Kind of accident: Side collision
Train involved: Passenger Extra 251 West with 15 cars at 48 mph
Extra 849 West with 15 cars at 2 mph
Operation: Timetable, train orders and automatic block-signal system
Track: Single; 1 degree 10'left curve; practically level
Weather: Clear
Time: 12:52 a.m.
Casualties: 10 killed; 11 injured
Cause: Train fouling main track immediately in front of following train

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
INVESTIGATION NO. 2717
IN THE MATTER OF MAKING ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORTS UNDER THE ACCIDENT REPORTS ACT OF MAY 6, 1910.
THE CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE, ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY
September 7, 1943.
Accident at Warden, Wash., on August 4, 1943, caused by a train fouling the resin track immediately in front of a following train.

REPORT OF THE COMMISSION 1
PATTERSON, Commissioner:
On August 4, 1943, there was a side collision between a mixed train and a passenger train on the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad at Warden, Wash., which resulted in the death of 10 passengers, and the injury of 10 passengers and 1 railway official. This accident was investigated in conjunction with a representative of the Washington Department of Public Service.

Inv-2717 Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Warden, Wash. August 4, 1943
Location of Accident and Method of Operation
This accident occurred on that part of the Coast Division designated as the Third Subdivision and extending between Malden and Othello, Wash., 103.4 miles. In the vicinity of the point of accident this was a single-track line over which trains were operated by timetable, train orders and an automatic block-signal system. At Warden a siding 3,506 feet in length paralleled the main track on the north. The west switch of this siding was 2,716 feet west of the station. The clearance point at the west end of the siding was 184 feet east of the switch. The accident occurred 59 feet west of the clearance point and 125 feet east of the west siding-switch. From the east the main track was tangent 1,631 feet, then there was a 1 degree 10'curve to the left 4,972 feet to the point of accident and 4,102 feet beyond. At the point of accident the grade was practically level.
Automatic signals 90-5 and 91-1, which governed west-bound movements, were located, respectively, 3,428 feet east and 138 feet west of the point of accident. These signals were of the one-arm, two-position, upper-quadrant, semaphore type, and were approach-lighted.
Operating rules read in part as follows:
513. Unless otherwise provided, before a train or engine enters on or fouls a main track trainmen will operate the switch and wait two minutes at the switch before making engine or train movement. This will not relieve employees from the duty of promptly and properly protecting the movement.
514 (A).
Trains or engines proceeding from sidings to the main track, must remain clear of the insulated joints at the clearance point on such tracks until the main track switch has been opened.
The maximum authorized speed for passenger trains was 60 miles per hour.

Description of Accident
Extra 849 West, a west-bound mixed train, consisting of engine 849, 13 freight cars, one baggage-express car and one coach, stopped on the siding in the vicinity of the station at Warden about 12:35 a.m. About 12:52 a.m., after this train had moved westward on the siding and stopped with the engine fouling the main track about 125 feet east of the west siding-switch, an attempt was being made to back into clear when the engine was struck by Passenger Extra 251 West.
Passenger Extra 251 West, a west-bound passenger train, consisted of engine 251, 1 baggage car and 19 Pullman sleeping cars, in the order named. All care were of standard all-steel construction. This train passed Lind, 22.6 miles east of Warden and the last open office east of Warden, at 12:12 a.m., according to the dispatcher's record of movement of trains, passed signal 90-5, which displayed proceed, and while moving at a speed of 48 miles per hour, as indicated by the tape of the speed recorder with which engine 251 was equipped, it collided with Extra 849.
Engine 849 and its tender were derailed and badly damaged. The engine stopped on its right side north of the siding. The tender stopped upright behind the engine. The first car of Extra 849 was slightly damaged. Engine 251 and its tender were derailed, badly damaged, and stopped about 250 feet west of the point of accident, on their left sides and south of the main track. The first two cars of Extra 251 were derailed, slightly damaged, and stopped practically upright and in line with the track. The front truck of the third car was derailed. The rear end of the eleventh car telescoped the front portion of the twelfth car a distance of about 37 feet. The rear truck of the eleventh car driven forward 35 feet and the rear end of the car was badly damaged. The front portion of the twelfth car was demolished.
It was clear at the time of the accident, which occurred about 12:52 a.m.

Discussion
The rules governing operation in automatic block-signal territory on this line provide that a train or an engine proceeding from a siding to the main track must remain clear of the insulated joints at the clearance point until the switch has been opened. In addition, an interval of 2 minutes must elapse after the switch has been opened before a movement to the main track may be made. The employees involved understood these requirements.
Extra 849 West stopped into clear on the siding at Warden about 12:35 a.m. About 17 minutes later, after this train had moved westward on the siding and stopped, the engine fouled the main track on the turnout of the west switch. While this train was moving in backward motion in an attempt to clear the main track the engine was struck by Passenger Extra 251 West. No train order restricting the authority of either train to proceed had been issued. Under the rules, Extra 849 was required not to pass the clearance point of the west siding-switch until after the switch had been in open position an interval of 2 minutes.
As Passenger Extra 251 was approaching Warden, the speed was about 55 miles per hour. The enginemen and a traveling engineer were maintaining a lookout ahead from the engine cab. The last automatic signal this train passed displayed proceed. The first warning the crew had of anything being wrong was when their engine reached a point about 1,000 feet east of the west siding-switch and they saw stop signals being given from a point about 130 feet distant. The engineer immediately moved the brake valve to emergency position but he could not stop his train short of engine 849.
The conductor of Extra 849 said he received information from the operator at Warden about 12:45 a.m. that Passenger Extra 251 would pass Warden about 12:50 a.m. He said he expected his train to move westward on the siding but to remain into clear until Passenger Extra 251 passed, and he instructed his crew accordingly. The conductor and the flagman were on the rear car, and the front brakeman and the enginemen were on the engine. The employees on the engine said they misunderstood the instructions of the conductor and they thought their train was to proceed ahead of Passenger Extra 251. Extra 849 proceeded westward on the siding and when the engine reached a point a short distance east of the west siding-switch, the front brakeman got off the engine and ran toward the switch to line it for movement to the main track. Soon afterward the fireman saw the approaching train and called a warning to the engineer, who immediately reversed the movement in an unsuccessful attempt to back the train into clear. The flagman said he gave signals for Passenger Extra 251 to stop when he became aware that his train had fouled the main track, but this action was not taken in time to prevent the accident.

Cause
It is found that this accident was caused by a train fouling the main track immediately in front of a following train.
Dated at Washington, D. C., this seventh day of September, 1943.
By the Commission, Commissioner Patterson.

W. P. BARTEL
Secretary
FOOT NOTE 1 Under authority of section 17 (2) of the Interstate Commerce Act the above-entitled proceeding was referred by the Commission to Commissioner Patterson for consideration and disposition.




Monday, April 7, 2008